小雞逛遊樂園: Book Review


Title: 小雞逛遊樂園 (xiao3 ji guang4 you2 le4 yuan2)/Baby Chicks at the Forest Park

ISBN: 9789862112793

Authors/Illustrations: Noriko Kudo (translated from Japanese) 文、圖/工藤紀子,翻譯/劉握瑜

Publisher:  小魯文化事業股份有限公司 (Xiao Lu Wen Hua/Tsai Fong Books)

Published: 2012

Level: Beginning Reader, Zhuyin, Picture Book, Fiction

Pages: 36

Summary: The five little chicks go to the amusement park and have a lot of fun going to all the attractions. Then they have a picnic. (Seriously, that’s it.)

Sample Pages:


Rating: 5/5 stars

5 Minute Review: Gamera (5) LOVES the 小雞 (xiao3 ji)/Baby Chick series. Kudo’s adorable illustrations and cute conversations are a big reason.

Gamera will choose one of the five books in the Baby Chick series to read over and over again. She practically has them memorized.

She first heard these stories at her Chinese preschool and despite having heard and read these stories countless times, Gamera just can’t get enough.

Although there is occasionally some harder vocabulary, it is nothing zhuyin doesn’t solve quickly and easily. The storyline is simple and easy to follow.

Mostly, Gamera just loves to look at the illustrations and thinks the baby chicks are the cutest. She also likes to read the occasional Chinese characters within the actual illustrations (these do not have zhuyin).

Incidentally, though Cookie Monster (7) has never chosen these books to read (mostly because we are going through our books very systematically with him), he finds the stories fun and adorable, too. He mostly just hovers nearby when Gamera reads them and he will flip through to see the illustrations. He also heard them at preschool when he was younger.

Highly recommend.

Here’s a video of Gamera reading an excerpt. You can tell she really likes to look at the pictures! (You can also tell I am totally missing the point of picture books.) 

我要吃小孩: Book Review


Title: 我愛吃小孩 (wo3 yao4 chi xiao3 hai2)/I Want to Eat a Child

ISBN: 9789865876135

Authors/Illustrations: 文/希薇安丶東尼歐,圖/多蘿特丶蒙弗列特,譯/蘇㦤禎 (translated from French)

Publisher: 阿布拉教育文化

Level: Beginning Reader, Zhuyin, Picture Book, Fiction

Summary: Archie, the alligator, doesn’t want to eat any more bananas. He wants to eat a child. Archie’s parents are really worried and try to tempt him with yummy foods but he refuses them all. He finally notices a child but is unable to eat her. He goes home, determined to try again.

Sample Pages:



Rating: 5/5 stars

5 Minute Review: From when I first saw this book at Eslite, I had to buy it. It’s ridiculous and cute and has fun illustrations and a silly story. All my kids enjoyed the book from the get go and I was able to read it because it had zhuyin.

Gamera (5) recently chose to read this book out loud to me and did pretty good for the most part. Some characters she didn’t recognize so she used zhuyin. She can be lazy and forgets to use the zhuyin when she doesn’t know a character. Or she starts reading zhuyin and forgets to read the actual characters. I know this will stop once I start having her read more consistently (but I suffer from constant laziness).

Anyhow, Gamera had a relatively easy time reading the story save a few stumbles. The vocabulary is simple and easy to understand. The pictures are bright and fun. It took Gamera about 20 minutes to read all the way through.

Definitely recommend for adults to read to their children (as well as having children learn to read it themselves).

Here is a video of her reading an excerpt (with commentary from Cookie Monster).

The Case for Zhuyin (Bopomofo)

*A/N: This piece is part of an on-going series. You can find the rest under the So You Want Your Kid to Learn Chinese tag or under the Resources Menu.

Before I go any further, I want to point out what this post is NOT. This is not a post pitting pinyin against zhuyin.

I am not interested in some dogmatic discussion about how zhuyin or pinyin is superior to the other. That is boring and stupid because it assumes that there can only be one thing that helps kids and adults learn Chinese. Life isn’t The Voice or American Idol. It is quite possible to have multiple good things simultaneously existing without resorting to which is “best.” Best for what, anyway?

What I actually want to do with this post is to make the case for why, if you want your kids to learn Chinese, in addition to having them learn pinyin, to also learn zhuyin. 

Also, this post pre-supposes you want your child to be literate in Chinese (be it Traditional or Simplified). And by literate, I mean actual literacy – not just recognize a few words here and there like 大小上下. For our purposes, by literate I mean that your child should be able to read a newspaper with ease and recognize about 2,000-4,000 characters (at approximately Chinese 3rd or 4th grade level and Taiwanese 6th grade level). That is what both Mainland China as well as Taiwan consider “literate” and able to function in their societies. (I, personally, do not qualify as literate in this case. I am, on my best best best day, at about 800-1,000 characters.)

Incidentally, I could write a post focusing on a lower standard of literacy, but really, what would be the point? How would that even be remotely useful? (Sorry, this is totally a pet peeve of mine when people complain about my posts having standards that are too high. I digress.)

Anyhow, I actually think it is impractical not to know pinyin since it uses the romantic alphabet with which most English speakers are familiar. Also, it is especially useful for typing in Chinese since we are already used to typing using the American keyboard. I am much faster typing Chinese via my pinyin keyboard versus my zhuyin or handwriting keyboard.

For adults and children who already know how to read English, they don’t have to learn a new “alphabet” and can almost immediately begin to try “reading” Chinese (albeit without comprehension) as long as there is pinyin next to Chinese characters. There is definitely a huge benefit to that!

Of course, this does prove problematic when it comes to proper pronunciation because if you already know how to read English (or any other language that uses the romantic alphabet), you are already used to another way of pronouncing those phonics. It is hard to get rid of that initial learning. Personally, I think the only reason I can pronounce things correctly with pinyin is because I already knew zhuyin.

But first, before I continue, for those who have zero knowledge: What the heck are pinyin and zhuyin anyway? Lucky for you, I link to stuff on Wikipedia with abandon!

Pinyin – A standardized form of phonetics for transcribing Mandarin pronunciation of Chinese characters into the romantic alphabet. Used in Mainland China, Taiwan, and Singapore. Introduced in the 1950s. Replaced the old Wade-Giles Romanization.

Zhuyin (Bopomofo) – A standardized form of phonetic notation/symbols for transcribing Mandarin pronunciation of Chinese characters. Introduced in the 1910s in China and Taiwan although pinyin replaced zhuyin in China whereas Taiwan still considers Zhuyin its official form of phonetic notation.

The history of zhuyin is fascinating (and all the symbols are derived from “regularized” forms of ancient Chinese characters) and I highly recommend you read the Wikipedia article.

Okay, you might be thinking. That’s great that there is another phonetic notation out there to help kids read Chinese, but why would they need to learn an entirely different phonetic system if they already know pinyin? Isn’t that just redundant and adding an extra layer of unnecessary difficulty for your kids?

That’s a totally legitimate question and before I get to it, I want to point out a few things first.

One of the best ways to learn how to read and comprehend what you’re reading is to actually read. And to read a lot. (I know. It seems so obvious and unnecessary to point out, but nevertheless, I did.) So, for most children, their English reading (as well as Chinese reading) improves and gets better the more often and varied materials they read. It is especially helpful when kids find subjects and stories they love because then reading is fun, engaging, and interesting.

For English readers, this is not really a problem because once children learn phonics, they can pretty much read anything as long as they can blend the sounds. The limiting factor for children reading in English (whether native speaker or not) is then a matter of comprehension.

However, Chinese is NOT a phonetic language. Written Chinese is logosyllabic (ie: each syllable is represented by a character) and there are upwards of 20,000-40,000 unique characters – of which you require about 2,000-4,000 to be considered functionally literate. A word can be either a single character (eg: 大 /big) or a combination of characters (eg: 眼睛/eye).

Here’s the sad truth: If your child understands more Chinese than they can read, the limiting factor for them reading Chinese books is character recognition. 

Furthermore, if your child is not a native speaker and doesn’t have much additional language support, they will be severely limited by both comprehension as well as character recognition.

Chinese literacy will be difficult. I cannot overstate that fact.

Consider also, the fact that millions of American Born Chinese (as well as Brought Over By Airplane) people can speak and understand Chinese and yet, even for them, they can perhaps barely read a menu. (And only because food is an incredible motivating factor.)

Here are some more sobering facts for you:

Chinese Character/Word Recognition by Grade Level, Taiwan

Grade LevelReading (characters / words)Writing (characters / words)
1400 / 600300 / 400
2800 / 1200600 / 800
31200 / 1800900 / 1200
41600 / 24001200 / 1600
52000 / 30001500 / 2400
62400 / 36001800 / 3000
Chart excerpted from GuavaRama's excellent post on Chinese Characters by Grade Level.

 

Chinese Character/Word Recognition by Grade Level, China

Grade LevelReading (characters / words)Writing (characters / words)
1-21600800
3-425002000
5-630002500
7-935003000
Chart uses data from Stackexchange's forum that references the original source at Baidu.

 

Chinese Character/Word Recognition by Grade Level, Mandarin Immersion in US

Grade LevelReading (characters / words)Writing (characters / words)
150-10050-100
2130-250130-250
3230-400230-400
4330-550330-550
5430-700430-700
Chart uses data pulled from the few Mandarin Immersion schools that posted Character guides for each grade level. Also included some other data from anecdotal sources. Jinshan Mandarin Education Council, Woodstock School, MIP

 

Unfortunately, if your child already knows how to read English, it is highly improbable that their Chinese recognition is advanced enough for them to read at the same level (in subject matter, depth, and difficulty) as they can already read in English. (Incidentally, because they already understand and have applied the concepts of phonics and blending, they should pick up zhuyin really easily.)

From 我要吃小孩 (I Want to Eat a Child) by Sylviane Donnio, children's book

Zhuyin Sample 1: From 我要吃小孩 (I Want to Eat a Child) by Sylviane Donnio, children’s book

Consider Zhuyin Sample 1, an excerpt from a children’s book (click to embiggen). My almost six year old son, Cookie Monster, can read about 400-500 characters but still can’t read ALL of these characters on this page. He can read most of them – but definitely not ALL. So, even though he knows about 15% of the High Frequency Words, he still cannot read a children’s book.

If you’re paying attention, you’ll notice that Cookie Monster is at about the 3rd-5th grade level in US Mandarin Immersion schools. If you think a 3rd-5th grader will find this book interesting beyond possibly five minutes (if even that), I would daresay you should reconsider.

Now, Cookie Monster is turning six in a few weeks and cannot read English (something I have chosen to do purposefully). But if he could read English, likely he would be able to read a comparable children’s story in English with great ease. And if he were used to that level of reading and comprehension, the fact that he could not read all the words in this “baby” book would be incredibly frustrating.

I have many friends whose kids, at six and a half, are already reading chapter books in English. There is NO WAY they could read chapter books in Chinese (and these are kids in 90/10 Mandarin Immersion schools).

As a result, the Chinese books they can read are too “babyish” for them and they lose interest either due to dull subject matter or because the stuff they would actually be interested in reading is too hard so they give up.

Zhuyin Sample 2: The explanation of a Tang classical poem, 靜夜思(A Quiet Night Thought) by 李白 (Li Bai)

Zhuyin offers your child a way to read the materials they want at the level they want without character recognition being a hurdle.

Because zhuyin is phonetic, it is a fantastic tool for “leveling” the reading field, as it were. As you can see from the pictures (click to embiggen), zhuyin is usually placed to the right of Chinese characters so children can read the characters they know and if they happen upon a character they don’t know, they can just look at the zhuyin to read the phonetic notation and they will be able to continue through the story with no problem. The only limit, again, being their understanding/comprehension (as it would be in English).

Zhuyin Sample 2 is an excerpt from a Chinese Tang poetry book I owned when I was a child. This particular page is explaining the meaning of the classical poem, 靜夜思(A Quiet Night Thought) by 李白 (Li Bai). Now, even though I can read perhaps at best, 800-1,000 characters, I can read every single word in this sample because of the zhuyin. Now, whether I comprehend these words is a different story, but I am not hindered from reading and learning from the text by my limited vocabulary.

Thus, a child, if they were interested in Chinese Tang poetry, could read and potentially understand this subject matter. (Truthfully, I think that if it were the same type of text explaining a Shakespearean sonnet in English, the comprehension level would likely be about the same).

Now, I don’t know too many kids interested in classical Chinese poetry – but surely, you can extrapolate and come up with some books a 3rd, 4th, or 5th grader might be interested in reading – and THOSE could be in zhuyin.

My point is that now, the primary obstacle (character recognition) to your child reading in Chinese has now been removed. English and Chinese reading are both now on a more “level” playing field. Of course, if your child is not a native speaker of Chinese, (and even if they are), most likely, because we live in an English speaking country, your child’s English comprehension will still surpass their Chinese comprehension.

But as I mentioned earlier, the more your child reads (in both quantity and variety), the more your child will understand.

Well, I can hear you thinking. Why not just get books in both pinyin and Chinese? And what about kids in China? Don’t they use pinyin and their pronunciation is just fine?

Great questions.

To the first, in China, my understanding is that only textbooks use pinyin with Chinese characters – and even then, only for young children. There is a reason children in Mainland China learn Chinese characters at a higher rate than kids in Taiwan. They need to amp up their character recognition in order to read the books at their intersecting comprehension and interest levels.

In Taiwan, zhuyin is only phased out at the 3rd-4th grade level so children can afford to learn Chinese characters at a slower rate than their Mainland Chinese counterparts. As a result, the majority of children’s literature will also have zhuyin so kids can enjoy many types of books without being limited by their lesser character recognition.

For kids in English speaking countries, there is a reason Immersion schools delay the teaching of pinyin until their students have already mastered reading in English. Otherwise, it is too easy for kids to confuse the “different” sounds each letter symbolizes in English and pinyin. When they finally do learn pinyin, their pronunciation of Chinese often suffers because it is much easier to “slip” into the English instead of the Chinese letter pronunciation.

As for why kids in China aren’t affected by pinyin pronunciations, I should think it’s obvious: they’re Chinese. They live in China. Where the official language is Mandarin Chinese. They already speak and understand Chinese (just like an American kid already speaks and understands English). I think it would be a little ridiculous to expect the Chinese people to have trouble pronouncing their own language.

When kids in China use pinyin, they are literally using it in the same manner kids in Taiwan are using zhuyin. But since they learn so many more characters at a lower grade level, there is less of a need to have books with pinyin in them. (Plus, there is a little problematic matter of formatting. Fitting Chinese characters to pinyin makes for very awkward formatting issues in books. Can you imagine how bulky a chapter book would be?)

However, since Taiwanese kids are still using zhuyin up to about 3rd or 4th grade, there are lots and lots of books (both chapter and non, fiction or non-fiction) with zhuyin. (I recall that in 5th grade, I read Little Women in Chinese first – and all due to the presence of zhuyin. So to this day, I still think of the four women’s character names in Chinese first.)

As a side benefit, because the books have more complicated characters with zhuyin, it also helps children with literacy and recognizing harder characters. They have already encountered them in their books and subject matter so when they finally learn the actual character without zhuyin, the kids have already been exposed enough so that it is relatively easier to remember.

Plus, now it doesn’t matter as much whether the characters are in Traditional or Simplified because regardless, as long as there is zhuyin, the kids can read the characters. In full disclosure, this is a bit of a false benefit since zhuyin is pretty much only used with Traditional characters since it is used primarily in Taiwan. So, it doesn’t really help kids who only know Traditional characters with Simplified.

However, it does open up a huge section of books to kids who only know Simplified (and honestly, Traditional, too) because as I mentioned, as long as they can read the zhuyin, character recognition is no longer the problem. (I wouldn’t be surprised then if kids also picked up Traditional characters, too. Another win!)

Another ancillary benefit of learning zhuyin is that since zhuyin was created from ancient forms of Chinese characters, lots of them show up as components in the actual Chinese characters (as well as look like the sound they make). This helps children recognize and remember the parts and components of more complicated characters. (My post last week discusses a little more in depth how characters are formed, as well as Traditional and Simplified characters.)

I know that Cookie Monster and Gamera, as well as Guava Rama’s son, Astroboy, all point out the different zhuyin, smaller characters, and radicals they see as components in a word. These visual cues definitely help the children remember what a character looks like, sounds like, and means. (My guess is that this may prove more useful with Traditional characters since many Simplified characters might have elided these components.)

For example (for clarity, I’m only including the components that look like zhuyin):

– An ㄠ and ㄏ in 麼
– 3 ㄑin 輕
– An ㄦ in 兒
– A ㄙ in 台

Now, obviously, kids can find other visual cues without knowing zhuyin – so by no means is it conferring a benefit the kids wouldn’t otherwise have. However, it is just an extra tool (actually, an extra 37 tools) the kids can use to help with recognizing Chinese characters – and as we have already established, Chinese is a difficult language to read and our kids need all the help they can get.

So, in summary, here are the main reasons why I think you should consider teaching your kids zhuyin in addition to pinyin:

1) Removes the considerable barrier of character recognition from reading age/interest appropriate materials. This leaves only the problem of Chinese comprehension which can easily be ameliorated by more reading practice (as well as listening and conversation which usually are well ahead of reading comprehension in English as well).

2) Opens up a vast selection of age/interest appropriate materials from Taiwan because character recognition is no longer an issue. This way, even if your child has only learned Simplified characters thus far, if they know zhuyin, they can also read (and perhaps learn) Traditional.

3) Improves pronunciation and tones because the symbols more accurately reflect those sounds. (Again, I realize that though the symbols may convert to roman letters, we as native English speakers, have a harder time “switching” pronunciation and can either slip or get lazy. Whatever the reason, the temptation to “read” the pinyin with English pronunciations is high.)

4) Increases character recognition of more complex characters due to exposure.

5) Adds an additional visual cue for children to help remember more complex and compounded characters.

6) If your child can already read English and understands the concept of blending and phonics, they will learn zhuyin quickly and easily. If they cannot already read English, this will introduce these concepts and make learning to read English easier.

7) Adds more tools in your children’s Chinese Toolkit in the sense that zhuyin is an alternate way to type on keyboards, look up words in dictionaries (sometimes, I just cannot figure out the pinyin of a word for the life of me and I just end up resorting to zhuyin and I find it in second), and substitute for unknown characters when writing (although I suppose technically, they can do that with pinyin, too).

8) Adds a “sound” cue for children. (h/t Guava Rama)

– ㄦ(er) in 兒 (er):  sounds like the zhuyin
– ㄅ(be) in 包 (bao): starts with the ㄅ zhuyin sound

Alright folks. As always, I am incapable of writing anything in brief. Thanks for sticking it through.

I sincerely hope you consider adding zhuyin to your children’s Chinese Toolkit. Most Mandarin Immersion elementary schools expect their kids to graduate at 5th grade with about 600-800 characters. That is only 20-27% of the High Frequency Words your children will need in order to be actually literate.

If that is fine with you, wonderful!

I am at approximately that level and except for when I’m in Taiwan or China, that has rarely ever prevented me from living a full and wonderful life in the US. (And even when I have been in Taiwan or China, the pain was relatively minor. Mostly my ego and being illiterate in a country where I look like the people there and the shame I feel – well, that’s a temporary and small thing.)

However, if you would like to increase your child’s Chinese literacy to be functional in Chinese/Taiwanese society, zhuyin will help you reach that goal with greater facility.

Thanks so much for reading! Have a great weekend.

Other resources:

1) Zhuyin Table – a complete listing of all Zhuyin/Bopomofo syllables used in Standard Chinese

2) A great Zhuyin/Pinyin conversion chart from Little Dynasty. (I don’t know how printable it is, but it’s the prettiest table I found.)

3) Miss Panda also has a great printable Zhuyin/Pinyin Conversion Table.

How To Change Chinese Characters To Zhuyin

H/T Oliver Tu for this Chinese hack. 

In case you use zhuyin (bopomofo) to teach your children Chinese, you should install Chinese font with zhuyin. Until your kids (or really, you) can read on their own, this will allow you to add phonetic assistance to anything you want to print out for them to read.

You can find such fonts at sites like this: http://cooltext.com/Fonts-Unicode-Chinese. Tu recommends the fonts 明體注音 and 明體破音.

Here is an example Tu included:

1) Copy a story in Chinese from a webpage and paste it to MS Word.

2) Select the 明體注音 and 明體破音 fonts.

3) Print out and use as children’s Chinese lesson for them to read.

4) Additionally, you can use websites to print out practice pages for them to practice their writing. (I will post more about these sites later when I have a chance.)

This way, the materials available for your children to read will be limited only by your imagination and not by limited published text and/or the funds to purchase such available texts!

Happy phonetically assisted reading!

Even More Chinese Bookstores

Here are even more online Chinese bookstores:

Singapore Math Inc. – Official US Distributor of Singapore Math materials. There are no English instructions or translations in the Chinese language instructional books. This series requires a teacher with proficiency in the Chinese Language. This series is NOT suitable for adult beginners trying to learn the Chinese Language. There are no teacher resources. They also provide some sample pages on site. Singapore Math also provides Math and Science materials in English.
Site Language: English
Physical Locations: No
Products: Latest Chinese books used in Singapore primary schools (grades 1-6) – Chinese Language for Primary Schools. Chinese Language for Primary Schools (New Edition) is now available for Primary 1A through 6B. Also
Product Languages: Simplified, pinyin

Pandabook – A one-stop Chinese learning resource shop. They specialize in providing materials for Chinese Immersion schools and Chinese Schools.
Site Language: English
Physical Locations: San Jose, CA (Bay Area) – Not open to public. Appointment only.
Products: Textbooks, Board Books, CDs, DVDs, Books, Picture Books, Graded Readers, Western story books, fairy tales, dictionaries, Math, Chinese classic stories, Math, Games, and crafts
Product Languages: Traditional, Simplified, zhuyin, pinyin, bilingual, English

China Sprout –  Site promotes learning of Chinese language and culture by providing Chinese and English books relating to Chinese language, Chinese test, Chinese food, Chinese zodiac, Chinese symbols, Chinese music, Chinese tea, Chinese calligraphy, Chinese New Year, Moon Festival, Spring Festival, Dragon Boat Festival and Chinese Arts. We also sell Chinese crafts, Chinese clothes and silk clothing.
Site Language: English
Physical Locations: No
Products: Textbooks (elementary – university), supplementary materials, Adult learners, HSK materials, Business Chinese, teacher sourcebooks, flash cards, posters, dictionaries, picturenaries, picture books, adoption books, culture books
Product Languages: Traditional, Simplified, zhuyin, pinyin, bilingual, English

Chinese Montessori Society – Note: I was cautioned to be wary of the quality, but there may be some good resources for preschoolers.
Site Language: Simplified Chinese
Physical Locations: No
Products: Teaching books, parenting books, children’s books, Montessori teaching materials
Product Languages: Simplified

Formosa Yes – A US-based online bookstore for Taiwanese books.
Site Language: Traditional Chinese
Physical Locations: No
Products: Chinese literature, maps, natural sciences, magnet books, pop-up books
Product Languages: Traditional, zhuyin

More Chinese Bookstores

Here are a few more online Chinese bookstores:

World Journal Bookstore (世界書局) – Bookstore affiliated with The World Journal newspaper (世界日報). Also has a children’s, magazine and Simplified books section.
Site Language: Traditional Chinese
Physical Locations: Multiple US locations
Products: Books (all subjects), magazines, children’s section
Product Languages: Traditional, Simplified,

Little Monkey and Mouse – A bookstore that features fun, attractive, and high-quality Chinese reading & educational materials, interactive media, toys, art and cultural products from Taiwan, Hong Kong, and China. Includes books with zhuyin and pinyin.
Site Language: English
Physical Locations: Belmont, CA (Bay Area)
Products: Books, educational materials, interactive media, toys, art and cultural products
Product Languages: Traditional, Simplified, zhuyin, pinyin, English, Spanish

Greenfield Education Center (青田教育中心) – This center publishes and sells high quality children books in Chinese and English geared for ages 0-14, as well as books for parents. They also hold courses for parents, teachers, and children.
Site Language: Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, English
Physical Locations: Hong Kong
Products: Proprietary learning materials, children’s books (learning Chinese and stories), multimedia, English books, parenting books
Product Languages: Traditional, Simplified, English

NanHai – Store provides pinyin or character only Simplified textbooks (K-college), test prep, and books. They also provide seminars, workshops, art, and cultural experiences. (ETA 4/23/15) According to CL, a fellow parent in one of my FB groups, she feels that Nanhai is not particularly catering towards the younger population; many of their books are for adult learners. Children books are limited. She bought from them once before and the service was fine.
Site Language: English
Physical Locations: Santa Clara, CA (Bay Area)
Products: K- college multiple subject textbooks, test prep, teacher aids, readers, reference materials, seminars, workshops, cultural experiences
Product Languages: Simplified, pinyin, bilingual, English

Mei Zhou Hua Yu (美洲語華) – Publisher of textbooks (K-10) in pinyin Traditional, zhuyin Traditional, pinyin Simplified. Also provide homework samples. Note: They do not have online ordering capabilities. You have to download an order form, fill it out, and then send the form and check to a Southern Californian address.
Site Language: Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, English
Physical Locations: No
Products: K-10 textbooks, homework samples
Product Languages: Traditional, Simplified, zhuyin, pinyin