Why I Have a Financial Advisor: Money Series Pt 5

Now, it may seem weird to you that I have a financial advisor – especially since I used to be one and own a financial advising firm with my mother. I’m sure it won’t be any surprise to anyone that my mother is my financial advisor. What can I say? It saves on fees.

Well, the reasons I have my mother manage my money versus managing it myself are largely the same reasons most people have a financial advisor. And those are because I don’t have some combination of the following:

1) Time
2) Interest
3) Ability
4) Resources

(For the record, mine is a combination of 1 and 2.) With that said, here is my inside scoop on what to look for in a financial advisor should you choose to have one.

Disclaimer: I am a financial advisor and own a financial advising firm with my mother. I am not being compensated by any entity or company for the following information. I am ONLY explaining what I do for my own family. If you should so choose to take this advice, please realize that it is not customized nor tailored for your specific situation. I am not dispensing personalized advice for you or your family. I am not responsible in any way, shape, or form if your investments rise or fall due to market conditions. YMMV. You have been warned.

1) Make sure you like the person. This seems like such a stupid reason. After all, there are plenty of likable people out there who should NOT be financial advisors. But ultimately, you’ll be discussing the details of your financial life as well as your hopes and dreams for the future (because let’s be real – that all requires money). If you don’t like your financial advisor, it’s going to be pretty difficult divulging such intimate information. Plus, you’ll be talking to them at least a few times a year. If you don’t like the person, you’ll put off meeting them, likely not follow their advice in a timely manner, and in general, waste everyone’s time.

2) Don’t get hung up on “The Best.” Just like the rest of life, “The Best” is a moving target and different for everybody. Whether it’s “The Best” advisor, fund, or stock, you’re most likely not going to have it. Or have it at the wrong time. There is no way out of the thousands of financial advisors you are going to have “The Best.” Even if you’re a gazillionaire, you’re not. Settle for good and competent. You want reasonable returns (whatever that means to you), sound advice, and a responsive attitude.

3) Don’t pay for a financial plan. Pay for advice and management. This is not to say that paying for a financial plan is a waste of money. Indeed, if you are confident that you will hold yourself accountable to following every single item on your plan, then, have at it. But let’s be real. You most likely won’t. Instead, you’ll have paid approximately $1,500-2,000 for a fat pile of paper that just sits on your shelf collecting dust while your financial house is still in shambles. Then a few years later, you’ll go through the cycle again.

Save everyone the trouble. Pay an advisor to manage your money. I wouldn’t necessarily give them full discretion over your funds (that seems unnecessarily trusting), but do follow their advice. Usually, this translates into a monthly fee. Think of it as having an advisor on retainer. Not only do you get to call them up and ask for advice any time you want, you also have someone actively looking at your account and managing it in a way that is consistent with your desires.

4) Along with #3, avoid paying per transaction/by commission. Now, realistically, some products are commission only. (eg: Annuities, life insurance, REITs) But for the most part, this way, you know that the advisor is recommending you buy/sell something because it really IS a good thing for your account (and not because they get paid a commission). As for annuities, life insurance, and REITs, they all have their place and can be good for you depending on your situation. Annuities and life insurance get pilloried quite often but in reality, I have highly recommended their usage. (Annuities especially since despite the higher cost, it’s the closest thing most people will get to a pension.)

5) Have as much of your assets at one place. I don’t mean one fund or one stock. I mean, have as much of your assets as possible held with the same financial advisor. Why? Because they will have a fuller view of your financial life and can give you better advice if they have the big picture. Also, it sounds awful, but financial advisors are only human. They will pay more attention to more money (because you are a bigger client). If you spread out your assets across several advisors, you are pretty much guaranteeing no one will look at your stuff.

Ok, that’s it for now. If I think of more, I will add it to this post or write another one. For those of you with financial advisors, what has your experience been? And for those of you without one, why haven’t you gotten one yet?

ETA:A friend asked me a great question on FB that I wanted to share with the rest of you.

I want to get started! Where do I start? It’s long overdue. How do you know which advisors are for you and your best interest? I thought of reading up on stock trading and understanding it, so I can do it myself. Signing up on Etrade? Talk to me. Lol.

Here’s my response:

I’d start by asking friends (especially those who are wealthier than you). Check out their recommendations. Or you can just walk into a Schwab, TD Ameritrade, or Ameriprise and ask for a broker on duty. Or, keep your eye out for seminars and attend some. Once you have some names, google and interview them.

Most advisors will talk to you and get to know you without charging you. If they do, run away. If they recommend you open an account or buy something with them before getting to know you, run away. Find out how they get paid. How do they decide or evaluate what is a good stock or fund? How do they determine when to sell? How often will they review your account? What type of clients are they looking for?

Also, trust your gut. If someone makes you feel uneasy, run. They may be perfectly honest but if YOU don’t feel comfortable, then they are not for you.

Most advisors end up with a book of business that looks like them. So you want to look for someone who is similar to you (except has time, interest, ability, and resources to do investments). You want someone who has similar values and world view.

Thanks for asking! Hope that helps. Feel free to ask more questions.

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